The 100: Spacewalker

the100spacewalker

THE 100: 2.08 “Spacewalker”

Midseason finales can be rough. And with a show like The 100, which is rather brutal and surprising every week, this rough finale was no surprise. If you haven’t yet seen last night’s episode and you don’t want to be spoiled, I suggest you stop reading now.

While the events of last night may not have been surprising, they were certainly poignant and painful. In the aftermath of Finn’s massacre and on the brink of war, the Grounders and Skypeople finally came to a truce. Unfortunately, that truce would only move forward if the Skypeople handed over Finn to die the 18 deaths of their people.

Of course, Clarke and crew were against it. Finn was their friend. Finn was one of their people. It was no surprise that Bellamy, Clarke, Raven — even Murphy — were trying to save him. What was surprising, to me at least, was that Clarke’s mother and other officials at Camp Jaha were trying to save him as well.

Why was this strange? Well, sure, he’s just a kid. He shouldn’t have to be handed to an enemy camp for death by torture. But then again, when did those in charge of Camp Jaha — those who used to run the Ark — ever look the other way at death for breaking the law. Floating people was their usual punishment. And while some of that might have been for the purposes of oxygen preservation, somehow I doubt that mentality would change once they were on the ground. It was in their government and culture. You break the law, you die. And when basically world peace is at stake (this is the only world they know now), it seems an obvious choice to sacrifice one boy for the sake of the rest of your people. (Perhaps this is just early insight into discovering that Clarke’s mother may not be all that great of a chancellor.)

What I wasn’t expecting for this episode was the flashbacks, where we finally discovered why Finn had been imprisoned. It wasn’t that he spacewalked himself, but he covered for Raven after helping her do it. Of course, all that was moot once Raven discovered that her physical reason for being held back was overturned given her records. Had Finn never been imprisoned, he would never have gotten on the ground, never met Clarke — well, you get the point.

This guilt for Raven was pushing her to extremes. She was willing to sacrifice Murphy, kill the Grounders’ leader, punch one of the Camp’s own officials. Honestly, this only made the episode better. I worried that we’d focus too much on Clarke and Finn, a relationship that was fine but not my favorite on the series (Bellmay/Clarke shippers unite; you now have your chance). So seeing Finn and Raven’s relationship back in the glory days of the Ark was really nice.

That said, Clarke’s desperate attempt to save Finn’s life — “He did it for me.” “Then he shall die for you.” — was just heartbreaking. And while it will only create a rift between Raven and Clarke (and possibly many others), it was the right choice to kill Finn to save him from the terrible torture ahead of him.

The ending somehow has stayed in my memory long after the episode ended. While it wasn’t necessarily a shock, I suppose I held out hope that somehow Finn would make it (even though you could easily argue that the show will be even better without him now that Clarke has to live with her actions and many people may be angry with her). I even wondered if that stabbing was really a kill — if it was all just a setup to have Finn released.

But no, I think it was the last we’ve seen of Finn, who ended up being a good-hearted kid. And when I woke up this morning, I felt that same sadness I felt as tears fell out of Clarke’s eyes (she did a great job on that scene, by the way). Once again, The 100 impresses. And now I’m just haunted, much like Clarke herself may be, until a January return.

*Photo by The CW

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One thought on “The 100: Spacewalker

  1. Love this review! I felt the same about Finn’s exit, it wasn’t a shock but it was the kind of ending that you keep thinking about afterwards. I think it was more fitting for him to have a more sombre death instead of an action-filled and really violent one as he was such a major character.

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