Dollhouse: When the end is here

Raked finally processed the finale, enough to write about it.

DOLLHOUSE:  2.13 “Epitaph Two: The Return”

I think you really have to wonder what’s going to happen as you step into the end of another Whedon series, especially when you take the leap ten years ahead, and you’re in a post-apocalyptic world of sorts–a world based on an episode that wasn’t even aired.

I’ve got to feel bad for anyone who didn’t watch “Epitaph One.” You had to have been pretty lost. Sure, you got the general idea of what happened, but who are Zone and Mag? Who is this little girl? (By the way, SO glad we got to see Zone develop as a character.)

For the rest of us, it was great. I’m not sure how I missed the memo that Felicia Day would be returning to Dollhouse, but it was worth it. Even if she lost her legs in the process.

I have to admit, Whedon knows how to create a sense of surprise. The two main deaths of the episode were, of course, Ballard and Topher. I don’t know why I didn’t see Ballard’s death coming after his conversation with Echo, but maybe that was because I was lost in Mag’s pain. The shock of having her legs hole-punched was enough. You had that moment where you thought nothing else could happen worse–and then you had Ballard.

Meanwhile, we all knew that Topher was going to die when he went up to Adelle’s office. So why was it such a surprise? We had no idea that he’d completed the device, so when he took that moment to look at the photos, we really all just paused and took a moment. His final, “Hm,” was the last thing we ever heard.

Joss sure knows how to play with a viewer’s emotions.

But I must say, the most intriguing part of this episode was the techies. Seeing Victor with his teched out face, seeing him use the tech to change the language he speaks…it was so interesting. Almost tempting. You could see how it they could have gotten hooked on the tech. Even I thought how awesome it must’ve been to have any language or knowledge easily put into your head.

And how do you think this all started? Well, I guess technically we’ll never know, but it sure made me wonder whether it all started with the Victor upgrade that we saw in “Hollow Men.” If we could upgrade Victor’s fighting skills, why not his knowledge? Why not his language? Why not everything? After all, Echo is holding all sorts of specialties in her head. Why not everyone else?

I loved that aspect of the episode. It really made you realize that in this world that was crumbling apart, it wasn’t just Rossum that was taking over the tech. It could be in anyone’s hands.

And by the way, Rossum: Was it not creepy to see Harding choosing the next body he could abuse? “Stretch out”? Uggh, just made me shiver.

Overall, it was a very powerful finale. I’m glad we really got to see the end–and the end of the end–even if we did say good-bye to two of our favorite characters. I loved how we saw Adelle become the heartfelt figure she always had in her, and Sierra finally got a happy ending. And while, true, it was a little over the top, I liked that Ballard and Echo got their happy ending, even if it was only in her head, especially since it was a final gift form Alpha.

I think I could have watched the apocalyptic episodes over and over–a series on its own, really. I guess that just shows us how much a show like this really had. And yet, it lived a life so short.

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6 thoughts on “Dollhouse: When the end is here

  1. Pingback: Dollhouse: Giving back « Raked

  2. …it sure made me wonder whether it all started with the Victor upgrade that we saw in “Hollow Men.”

    Ooooh! That makes a lot of sense. I like this.

  3. I’m angry that they didn’t make an allusion to “Needs”‘s last few seconds during the final “re-wripe” bomb redemption. Everyone walking out of the Dollhouse, falling down.

    Could’ve been gold. Instead I didn’t feel anything.

    I’d rather have seen Whiskey than Alpha’s return, if we’re picking and choosing guest star salaries.

  4. Oh good point about “Needs.” I had completely forgotten about that (I was a bad fan who didn’t rewatch season one in the couple weeks before the finale). I guess they could have made that more artistic.

    I missed Whiskey, too, but I guess we were supposed to just assume she was dead and gone. But they got video of Summer Glau in there! Anyway, I missed her. I felt bad for anyone who didn’t see “Epitaph One.” That one clip of Whiskey from that episode in the “previously on…” sequence really just confused you more than anything else if you hadn’t seen the episode. Fortunately, I had.

    But I did miss her.

  5. Pingback: Last time on ‘Vampire Diaries’ « Raked

  6. Im a little late on the comments here, but i wanted to point out the line that Summer Glau says in her tutorial video that pretty much sums up the show:

    “We literally become what we do, not what we’ve done, or what we will do. We’re best defined by our actions in the moment”

    This was pointed out to me in the io9 review of the epitaph two:
    http://io9.com/5460420/dollhouse-isnt-really-over

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