Golden Globes Nominees: My thoughts

So the 2011 Golden Globes nominees have been announced, and as for the TV stuff, I’d say there were certainly some surprises. Here’s the TV list below, then check out my reactions after the jump.

Best Television Series Drama
BOARDWALK EMPIRE
DEXTER
THE GOOD WIFE
MAD MEN
THE WALKING DEAD

Best Television Series – Comedy/Musical
30 ROCK
THE BIG BANG THEORY
THE BIG C
GLEE
MODERN FAMILY
NURSE JACKIE

Best Television Series – Miniseries/Movie
CARLOS
THE PACIFIC
PILLARS OF THE EARTH
TEMPLE GRANDIN
YOU DON’T KNOW JACK

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Comedy/Musical
Toni Collette, UNITED STATES OF TARA
Edie Falco, NURSE JACKIE
Tina Fey, 30 ROCK
Laura Linney, THE BIG C
Lea Michele, GLEE

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Comedy/Musical
Alec Baldwin, 30 ROCK
Steve Carell, THE OFFICE
Thomas Jane, HUNG
Matthew Morrison, GLEE
Jim Parsons, THE BIG BANG THEORY
Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama
Julianna Margulies, THE GOOD WIFE
Elizabeth Moss, MAD MEN
Piper Perabo, COVERT AFFAIRS
Katey Sagal, SONS OF ANARCHY
Kyra Sedgwick, THE CLOSER

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
Steve Buscemi, BOARDWALK EMPIRE
Bryan Cranston, BREAKING BAD
Michael C. Hall, DEXTER
Jon Hamm, MAD MEN
Hugh Laurie, HOUSE

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Scott Caan, HAWAII FIVE-0
Chris Colfer, GLEE
Chris Noth, THE GOOD WIFE
Eric Stonestreet, MODERN FAMILY
David Strathairn, TEMPLE GRANDIN

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Hope Davis, THE SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP
Jane Lynch, GLEE
Kelly Macdonald, BOARDWALK EMPIRE
Julia Stiles, DEXTER
Sofia Vergara, MODERN FAMILY

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television
Idris Elba, LUTHOR
Ian McSHane, THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH
Al Pacino, YOU DON’T KNOW JACK
Dennis Quaid, THE SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP
Edgar Ramirez, CARLOS

Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television
Hayley Atwell, PILLARS OF THE EARTH
Claire Danes, TEMPLE GRANDIN
Judi Dench, RETURN TO CRANFORD
Romola Garai, EMMA
Jennifer Love Hewitt, THE CLIENT LIST

Check out my reactions after the jump! Continue reading

Just a random update

On such a murky Monday morning (which is not true, the sun is shining, and while it snowed this morning, it has stopped now), I’ve stopped to post random things on my blog. Why? Because it’s mine.

Muah-ah-ah-ha.

Just kidding. No, it’s actually just to inform you that I didn’t catch Desperate Housewives last night in favor of the Golden Globes. Which I TiVoed. By the way, that’s the best way to watch it. You can fast forward through all those speeches by people that you don’t know about movies that you never heard of (sorry, Best Foreign Film). But I plan to catch up on DH by way of the internet (rock on, internet), and I hope to have a review up tonight, tomorrow, or the next day. Maybe Tuesday. I don’t think much is on on Tuesday except maybe Scrubs. Let me know if I’m wrong.

Anyway, but it seems like that can’t make a long enough post, so let’s discuss Disney.

Is it just me or is Disney only making pop stars now? Ok, that seems like an obvious statement, but let’s look back.

This all started with Hilary Duff. She was an actress–had her own series. And then, wonder of wonders, miracle of miracles, SHE COULD SING! And they had her sing, in one episode. And then a movie. But it wasn’t like they were making a career out of it.

Well, Hilary wanted to make a career out of it, so they did. And it was successful!

So then they thought, what if other people could sing? So they gave it a shot: Christy Carlson Romano–yes! But instead of pop, she went on to Broadway. LaLaine–eh, she had a single on Disney Channel alone. Then went on to Buffy (for a short stint). And Raven–crap, apparently they thought she could sing when I disagreed.

But look: Raven wasn’t automatically a pop star. They cast her in a TV movie: The Cheetah Girls. And then they broke out with pop once that became popular.

But there were others, you know. What about Shia LeBeouf? He was from Disney and he didn’t sing. But no one mentions him. Why? He’s not a pop star. He’s just *gasp* an actor.

But now, everyone on the Disney Channel sings, either on Radio Disney and in commercials or on the radio. It’s almost like a requirement that they must sing. Even those stupid kids on As the Bell Rings are starting to sing. Why, people. Why why why?

There’s like this cookie-cutter mold that each person on the Disney Channel must fit into now. True the High School Musical franchise somehow made it big, so I understand why Zac Efron and Vanessa Hudgens would then have singing careers. But the rest of them? Really?

Camp Rock was just horrible, but since it had the Jonas Brothers–who Disney basically built, by the way–it somehow is considered popular. At least all the merchandise would think so.

So which comes first? The pop star or the Disney star? Is there a difference anymore? All the up-and-comers that aren’t Dakota Fanning are from Disney–which means all the up-and-comers are overdone and annoying.

Anyway, just a thought. An annoying thought. I just wish that we’d have more good actors out there. It seems like raising these people in this fashion seems to be raising bad actors–look at Miley Cyrus for goodness’ sake! Since her popularity has grown, so has her overacting. Priorities are shifting.

And I know you all are going to mention Lindsay Lohan, but I still don’t consider her to really be a Disney Channel star. She was in one TV movie, but everything else was outside the channel itself.

I don’t know if I came to a conclusion, but maybe you all can come up with some if I haven’t.

Are the networks devoid of smart?

It’s not really a new question. In fact, people have asked it a lot. And in the void of new episodes of TV, I was thinking about it.

I remember when The Sopranos started on HBO. Now, I’ve never had HBO, so I never saw this series or Sex and the City until they were syndicated many years later. So it would bug the crap out of me to watch the Emmys or the Golden Globes and find all the awards going to shows I’ve never seen. And it still happens with HBO series and Showtime, too!

But now it’s spread a little further. If you look at the most recent list of Golden Globe nominees, you’ll see that the four basic networks–ABC, NBC, CBS, and FOX–aren’t nearly as represented as HBO, Showtime, and even TNT.

And why is that the case? Well, it seems to me that the four basic networks just don’t really have the time or money to spend on “smart” TV.

But let’s backtrack. What do I mean by “smart”? Well, I don’t mean “creative,” though there have been a number of cancellations for creative shows. I never watched Pushing Daisies, but you can’t disagree that it had a creative background and premise. Eli Stone, too. So it’s not necessarily creativity that I’m looking at.

Take a look at Studio 60. It was a very “smart” show. You really had to tune in and pay attention to really enjoy the show because there were a lot of storylines that fell below an episode’s plot–like Danny’s past addictions or Tom’s brother at war. It provoked thought.

Now, we take a look at shows like 90210 and The Office, which are basically spin-off/remakes of older, fresher favorites. Don’t get me wrong, I like The Office, but we’ve moved away from subtle humor in past seasons, and we’re now to the slapstick variety and cardboard characters.

And yes, there are exceptions. Lost is clearly a smart concept, though again, I haven’t seen it (sorry, I missed the first season and never caught up). But other shows have tried to keep mysteries throughout a series and they’ve fallen flat with few viewers: Hidden Palms and Reunion are just two.

Other shows have brought about the smart in the viewers; Numb3rs is  a huge example, where the show is actually bringing about mathematical ideas into a show that would otherwise be just a basic crime show.

But overall, there seems to be a lack of smart. When The West Wing, ER, and Gilmore Girls started, there were random quips and stronger storylines. However, people followed them. I know it seems odd that I included Gilmore Girls in there, but honestly, the fast-talking pop-culture basis really carried a smart feel–a feel that really declined in later seasons.

So what’s bringing this about? I’m afraid to say it (though I already have), but time and money. But whose?

Without viewers, shows can’t last. So if viewers won’t give a show like Studio 60 a chance because they don’t want to put that much attention to an hour-long program, then what can the networks really do? But then again, Pushing Daisies did have viewers. So what happened there?

Clearly, some of the fault lies in the networks. How long is long enough to decide? Four episodes (Drive)? Nine episodes (Reunion)? Fourteen (Firefly)? Twenty-five (Tru Calling)?

[Ok, I wasn't trying to only pick FOX shows there, but hey, look what happened. You get a prize if you can figure out what else all of those shows have in common.]

And you have to admit, the networks do have more problems with money. Unlike HBO, they don’t have a subscription basis, which means they can’t put all their money into one show. Cable series have had this advantage. They have much tighter budgets, and if something doesn’t make money AND QUICK, it can’t be on TV.

So true, they are at a disadvantage, but why do they have to go to reality TV before putting together something quality? Raising the Bar could have easily been shown on any network other than TNT, but it wasn’t. Possibly The Closer, too. Instead, we have too many competition shows and game shows–and Jay Leno’s getting his own nightly talk show at 10:00 pm!

What’s disappointing is that now I watch TV, and I’m bored. I want the smart back. I’d like to know that our basic networks aren’t free due to bad programming.

But anyway, what do you think? Viewers’ faults for not watching? Networks for not giving shows a chance? Or cable for being bullies? All opinions welcome.